woman talking on phone on train.jpg

Accessibility

On this page you can find helpful tips and links for access disability users. The information below can help you with using your computer and your web-browser.

Easy Read Documentation

To view and download our easy read posters please visit:

http://www.merseycare.nhs.uk/contact-us/easy-read-documents/ 

If you need to request any other documents in easy read form please contact:

communications@merseycare.nhs.uk

I can’t see very well

These guides explain ways to change how your computer or web browser operates, to make things easier for people who have difficulty seeing.


Change text and Backgrounds

Some people find certain text and background colour combinations difficult to read, while others prefer to always have a specific colour, such as white text on a black background. These guides explain how you can change the text and background colours in your operating system (Windows, Mac or Linux) and browser to better suit your needs.

There are two ways to do this…

Computer

http://www.bbc.co.uk/accessibility/guides/change_colours/computer/

Browser (Internet Explorer, Chrome, Firefox)

http://www.bbc.co.uk/accessibility/guides/change_colours/browser/

 

Change your Fonts

Some people find certain text styles or fonts difficult to read on their computer and on websites. For example, a serif style such as Times New Roman, or a 'cluttered' script such as Helvetica narrow. Most people find a sans-serif style such as Arial or Verdana more comfortable. Others find a mono-spaced font such as Courier easier to read - these may include people with dyslexia.

These guides explain how to change the font in your operating system (Windows, Mac or Linux). You can also change the default font in specific programmes such as web browsers, which will make it easier to surf the internet.

There are two ways to do this…

Computer

http://www.bbc.co.uk/accessibility/guides/change_fonts/computer/

Browser

http://www.bbc.co.uk/accessibility/guides/change_fonts/browser/

 

Magnify your screen

If increasing the text size on your operating system or web browser does not make text easy to read, then the next step is to magnify the screen. These guides explain how to use the magnification software that is built in to your operating system (Windows, Mac or Linux). There are also third-party software applications available.

Here’s how to do it… 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/accessibility/guides/magnify/computer/

 

Make the mouse pointer easier to use

There are a number of ways you can adapt your computer to make it easier to see the mouse pointer or cursor. These guides explain how to customise your operating system (Windows, Mac or Linux), so that you can change the colour and size of the mouse pointer, add trails to make it more visible, or highlight its location on your screen when a certain key is pressed.

 

Here's how to do this…

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/accessibility/guides/mouse_pointer/computer/

 

How to make your computer speak text aloud

You can make your computer talk in a number of ways, which can be a valuable facility for people who have difficulties with reading, for someone who can't see very well or at all, and for those who need to give their eyes a rest. These guides explain how to use the built-in speech function in your operating system (Windows, Mac or Linux). There are also third-party screen-readers and text-to-speech software applications available.

 

Here's how to do this…

http://www.bbc.co.uk/accessibility/guides/speak_text/computer/

 

How to make your text larger

You can make the text on your computer easier to see and read in a number of ways. These guides explain how to increase the text size in your operating system (Windows, Mac or Linux). You can also make the text bigger in specific programmes such as web browsers, which will make it easier to surf the internet.

 

There are three ways to do this…

Make the text larger on your computer

http://www.bbc.co.uk/accessibility/guides/text_larger/computer/

 

Make the text larger in your browser

http://www.bbc.co.uk/accessibility/guides/text_larger/browser/

 

Make the text larger in applications

http://www.bbc.co.uk/accessibility/guides/text_larger/programmes/

   

I am Blind

 

Make your computer speak text aloud

You can make your computer talk in a number of ways, which can be a valuable facility for people who have difficulties with reading, for someone who can't see very well or at all, and for those who need to give their eyes a rest. These guides explain how to use the built-in speech function in your operating system (Windows, Mac or Linux). There are also third-party screen-readers and text-to-speech software applications available.

 

Here's how to do this…

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/accessibility/guides/speak_text/

 

Overview: Screenreaders and talking browsers

Built-in speech-to-text features - such as Windows Narrator - come with most computer operating systems (Windows, Mac or Linux). However, with the exception of Mac OS X's VoiceOver, these are limited speech-output programmes and do not offer a complete solution for, for example, those with low vision. There are also various speech packages whose sole function is to make your web browser 'talk'.

To have a single application that does all of these things, and provides effective access to Microsoft Word, Internet Explorer and other programmes, someone who is blind or partially sighted may want to use a full screenreader.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/accessibility/guides/screenreaders/

 

General Accessibility Links

 

AbilityNet

http://www.abilitynet.org.uk/

Information, factsheets and step-by-step guides on approaches and technology to help disabled computer users. AbilityNet has useful links to UK organisations on their website, including literacy-related organisations and specialist IT suppliers.

 

Directgov- Disabled people

https://www.gov.uk/browse/disabilities

The Government's one-stop directory of public services relating to disability.

 

Disability Now

http://www.disabilitynow.org.uk/

Online edition of the magazine for people with disabilities

 

W3C – Web Accessibility Initiative

http://www.w3.org/WAI/

The WAI works with a variety of organisations to develop strategies, guidelines, and resources to help make the web accessible.

 

Vision-related web links

 
British Computer Association of the Blind

https://www.bcab.org.uk/

A self-help group of visually impaired computer professionals and users.

 

Royal National Institute of the Blind

http://www.rnib.org.uk/

Information on all aspects of vision impairment, including computer access and other technologies. The RNIB's Useful links page has a comprehensive list of UK vision-related technology and standards resources.

 

Hearing-related web links

 

Action on Hearing Loss

http://www.actiononhearingloss.org.uk/

The website of the rebranded Royal National Institute for the Deaf (RNID) has information and resources for deaf and hard of hearing people.

 

British Deaf Association

http://www.bda.org.uk/

News, information on British Sign Language, and other resources on the website of the organisation run by deaf people for deaf people.

 

BSL Academy

http://bslonline.org.uk/

The BDA's initiative to train and improve the quality of BSL (British Sign Language) teachers and to increase BSL awareness.

 

Deafax

http://www.deafax.org/

The website of the charity that applies communications technology to create deaf-friendly resources, notably Viewtalk, which allows users to watch and upload video blogs and messages, and has training films for improving BSL vocabulary.

 

European Union of the Deaf

http://www.eud.eu/

The EUD is a pan-European non-profit making organisation representing the interests of deaf Europeans.

 

Deaf Studies Trust

http://www.deafstudiestrust.org/

The Deaf Studies Trust (DST) is a national charity set up for the benefit of the Deaf community in the UK. It aims to apply research-based knowledge to practical issues for Deaf children and adults. It works also with hard of hearing adults.

 

 

 

Language and Reading Web links

 

British Dyslexia Association

http://www.bdadyslexia.org.uk/

Information on resources for dyslexic people, local support and publications.

 

Helen Arkell Dyslexia Centre

http://www.arkellcentre.org.uk/

The HADC offers training and support for educators and people with dyslexia.

 

Dyslexia Action

http://www.dyslexiaaction.org.uk/

Website of the charity providing services and support for people with dyslexia and literacy difficulties.

 

National Literacy Trust

http://www.literacytrust.org.uk/

Website of the charity that aims to improve reading and writing skills for all ages.

 

  

Keyboard and Mouse: mobility-related web links

 

Ace Centre- Resources

http://acecentre.org.uk/

The Ace Centre website's Resources section includes UK suppliers of communication aids.

 

Institute of Ergonomics and Human Factors

http://www.ergonomics.org.uk/

Information on ergonomics and ergonomic design - including computer workstation design.

 

Multiple Sclerosis Society

http://www.mssociety.org.uk/

The MS Society website has information and resources for people who have multiple sclerosis.

 

RSI Awareness

http://www.rsi.org.uk/

The Repetitive Strain Injury Association's website includes information on all aspects of RSI: causes, treatments, research and legal issues.