We have a dedicated team of professionals who are highly skilled and experienced in giving school aged vaccinations.

It is important to protect our children and young people against a number of dangerous infectious diseases.

The team work with primary schools and secondary schools, independent schools, special schools, alternative education and also support young people who are home educated or not in education.

The team also identify specific cohorts of children aged one year, two years or five years with missing vaccine/immunisations. Find out more in our leaflet.

Consent for vaccinations is initially required from parents.

If you not sure if your child has had all routine vaccinations, or you are 19 years old and under, please contact our service for further advice and support.

Has your child had their nasal flu vaccine?

Flu children social banner.jpg

 

The World Health Organization (WHO) says:

The two public health interventions that have had the greatest impact on the world’s health are clean water and vaccines.

View the figures here or below:

Infographic_Vaccines_v5.jpg

 

Why do we need immunisation?

The national immunisation programme has meant that dangerous diseases, such as polio, have disappeared in the UK. But these diseases could come back – they are still around in many countries throughout the world. That’s why it’s so important for you to protect yourself. In the UK, such diseases are kept at bay by the high immunisation rates.

How do vaccines work?

A vaccine contains a small part of the bacterium or virus that causes a disease, or tiny amounts of the chemicals the bacterium produces.

Vaccines work by causing the body’s immune system to make antibodies (substances to fight infections and diseases). So if you come into contact with the infection, the antibodies will recognise it and protect you.

Pre-School and School aged immunisations

When your child starts school or transfers school please ensure your school has your most up to date email address and mobile telephone number, to ensure you receive the link to your Childs immunisation information and consent form.

If you do not have access to the internet or mobile phone you can contact the service directly who will be happy to support you 0151 295 3833

 

Schedule of School based immunisations

Annual Nasal Flu Vaccine

The children's flu vaccine is safe and effective. It's offered every year as a nasal spray to children to help protect them against flu.

Flu is caused by a virus. It can be a very unpleasant illness for children. It can also lead to serious problems, such as bronchitis and pneumonia.

Children spread flu easily. Vaccinating them also protects others who are vulnerable to flu, such as babies and older people.

Further information can be found on NHS uk

3 years and 4 months- Before starting school

MMR (2nd dose)
4-in-1 pre-school booster
12 to 13 years – Year 8 HPV vaccine
14 years – Year 9 3-in-1 teenage booster
MenACWY

Speak to your GP surgery if:

  • you think you or your child have missed any vaccinations
  • you or your child have a vaccination appointment – but you've missed it or cannot attend

They can book or rearrange the next available appointment.

It’s best to have vaccines on time, but you can still catch up on most vaccines if you miss them.

The Vaccination and Immunisation Team consists of Registered Nurses and Health Care Support Workers who deliver the National School Age Programme of Immunisations in Liverpool. Check out this information on childhood vaccines.

 

The World Health Organization (WHO) says

The two public health interventions that have had the greatest impact on the world’s health are clean water and vaccines.

 View the figures here or below:

Infographic_Vaccines_v5.jpg

 

 

Why do we need immunisation?

The national immunisation programme has meant that dangerous diseases, such as polio, have disappeared in the UK. But these diseases could come back – they are still around in many countries throughout the world. That’s why it’s so important for you to protect yourself. In the UK, such diseases are kept at bay by the high immunisation rates.

 

How do vaccines work?

A vaccine contains a small part of the bacterium or virus that causes a disease, or tiny amounts of the chemicals the bacterium produces.

Vaccines work by causing the body’s immune system to make antibodies (substances to fight infections and diseases). So if you come into contact with the infection, the antibodies will recognise it and protect you.

 

Primary school Immunisations

 

Annual Nasal Flu Vaccine

During primary school your child will be offered their nasal flu spray between September to December

The children's flu vaccine is safe and effective. It's offered every year as a nasal spray to children to help protect them against flu.

Flu is caused by a virus. It can be a very unpleasant illness for children. It can also lead to serious problems, such as bronchitis and pneumonia.

Children spread flu easily. Vaccinating them also protects others who are vulnerable to flu, such as babies and older people.

More information can be found on NHS uk

Your school will send out a link to all parents/carers with Flu information and consent forms for completion.

Please make sure you have given your school your correct Email address and Mobile number to receive this link. 

 

Speak to your GP surgery if:

  • you think you or your child have missed any vaccinations
  • you or your child have a vaccination appointment – but you've missed it or cannot attend

They can book or rearrange the next available appointment.

It’s best to have vaccines on time, but you can still catch up on most vaccines if you miss them

The Vaccination and Immunisation Team consists of Registered Nurses and Health Care Support Workers who deliver the National School Age Programme of Immunisations in Liverpool. Here is some information on childhood vaccines.

The World Health Organization (WHO) says

The two public health interventions that have had the greatest impact on the world’s health are clean water and vaccines.

 View the figures here or below:

Infographic_Vaccines_v5.jpg

VaccinesSaveLives.png

Why do we need immunisation?

The national immunisation programme has meant that dangerous diseases, such as polio, have disappeared in the UK. But these diseases could come back – they are still around in many countries throughout the world. That’s why it’s so important for you to protect yourself. In the UK, such diseases are kept at bay by the high immunisation rates.

 

How do vaccines work?

A vaccine contains a small part of the bacterium or virus that causes a disease, or tiny amounts of the chemicals the bacterium produces.

Vaccines work by causing the body’s immune system to make antibodies (substances to fight infections and diseases). So if you come into contact with the infection, the antibodies will recognise it and protect you.

 

Secondary school Immunisations

When you child starts secondary school. Please ensure you have given school your correct Email address and Mobile number as this is how you will receive information regarding their upcoming immunisations and access the online to their consent form. 

 

Annual Nasal Flu Vaccine

The children's flu vaccine is safe and effective. It's offered every year as a nasal spray to children to help protect them against flu.

Flu is caused by a virus. It can be a very unpleasant illness for children. It can also lead to serious problems, such as bronchitis and pneumonia.

Children spread flu easily. Vaccinating them also protects others who are vulnerable to flu, such as babies and older people.

Further information can be found at NHS uk

 

Year 8 – HPV Vaccination

Girls and boys aged 12 to 13 years are offered the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine as part of the NHS vaccination programme.

The HPV vaccine helps protect against cancers caused by HPV, including:

It also helps protect against genital warts.

In England, girls and boys aged 12 to 13 years are routinely offered the 1st HPV vaccination when they're in school Year 8. The second dose is offered 6 to 24 months after the first dose.

It's important to have both doses of the vaccine to be properly protected.

For further information please visit NHS uk

 

Year 9 – Teenage Booster and Meningitis ACWY

The teenage booster, also known as the 3-in-1 or the Td/IPV vaccine, is given to boost protection against 3 separate diseases: tetanus, diphtheria and polio.

The MenACWY vaccine is also routinely offered to teenagers in school Years 9

The MenACWY vaccine is given by a single injection into the upper arm and protects against 4 strains of the meningococcal bacteria – A, C, W and Y – which cause meningitis and blood poisoning (septicaemia).

Children will receive these two immunisations one in each arm

 

MMR – (Measles, Mumps and Rubella) vaccine

If your child have not received 2 doses of MMR vaccine the service can also offer these with your consent with year 9 vaccinations

The MMR vaccine is a safe and effective combined vaccine.

It protects against 3 serious illnesses:

These highly infectious conditions can easily spread between unvaccinated people.

Getting vaccinated is important, as these conditions can also lead to serious problems including meningitis, hearing loss and problems during pregnancy.

2 doses of the MMR vaccine provide the best protection against measles, mumps and rubella.

 

Speak to your GP surgery if

you think you or your child have missed any vaccinations

you or your child have a vaccination appointment – but you've missed it or cannot attend

They can book or rearrange the next available appointment.

 

It’s best to have vaccines on time, but you can still catch up on most vaccines if you miss them.

Immunisation

It’s an exciting time thinking about your next choices and opportunities after school.

It’s important you are up to date with your immunisations before you start college, university or enter the workplace. 

Ensuring you are fully protected will ensure can enjoy your next experiences knowing you aren’t at risk of catching mumps or measles and that you have done all you can to protect yourself  and others from meningococcal disease.

With lots of people in confined environments and close mixing, universities can be hot spots for measles, mumps and meningococcal disease as they present the perfect opportunity for the infection to spread.

It’s never too late to get protected, contact your GP or immunisation team on 0151 295 3833 who will be happy to help

There has recently been an increase in measles cases across England as well as large measles outbreaks across Europe. We have also have seen outbreaks of mumps in universities in England. Teenagers and young adults who have not had two doses of MMR vaccine are particularly vulnerable to mumps and measles.

Similarly, a recent rise in cases of MenW meningococcal disease, led to the MenACWY vaccine being offered to teenagers.

 

Think measles, it's not just a kids' problem

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Mumps at Uni.png

 

Mersey Care NHS Foundation Trust is developing an electronic consent process for school based immunisations across Liverpool, Sefton, Knowsley and St Helens. This is an exciting new venture.  

We know from other immunisation providers who have implemented E-consent across the country that there are many additional benefits. E-consent is environmentally friendly and will provide greater reassurance with regards to infection control measures whilst in this pandemic.

Electronic consents will be implemented for our forthcoming flu campaign from September onwards. The nasal flu spray will be offered to all children and young people from reception to Year 11.

Families will receive a link from their child’s school by email or text message and will be asked to complete the consent form online. We do have other resources available for anyone who cannot access online facilities. Parents/carers can contact the service on the numbers below to receive further support and give their consent.  

On receipt of this link, please complete for your child even if you do not want them to receive this immunisation. We can then update their records accordingly and avoid you receiving any further follow up letters or phone calls from our service.

It will be resent out in September, please ensure your preferred email address and mobile number is up to date with school.

The children's flu vaccine is safe and effective. It's offered every year as a nasal spray to children to help protect them against flu. Flu is caused by a virus. It can be a very unpleasant illness for children. It can also lead to serious problems, such as bronchitis and pneumonia. Children spread flu easily.  Vaccinating them also protects others who are vulnerable to flu, such as babies and older people.

 

Any problems please contact your local immunisation teams:

Liverpool: 0151 295 3833

Sefton: 0151 247 6352

Knowsley: 0151 676 5141

St Helens: 01744 624 353