Information alert

If you are unsure of your child’s immunisation status or you would like to make an appointment, please contact your local team.

We have a dedicated team of professionals who are highly skilled and experienced in giving school aged vaccinations.

It is important to protect our children and young people against a number of dangerous infectious diseases.

The team work with primary schools and secondary schools, independent schools, special schools, alternative education and also support young people who are home educated or not in education.

Consent for vaccinations is initially required from parents.

If you not sure if your child has had all routine vaccinations, or you are 19 years old and under, please contact our service for further advice and support.

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The World Health Organization (WHO) says:

The two public health interventions that have had the greatest impact on the world’s health are clean water and vaccines.

View the figures here or below:

Infographic_Vaccines_v5.jpg

 

Why do we need immunisation?

The national immunisation programme has meant that dangerous diseases, such as polio, have disappeared in the UK. But these diseases could come back – they are still around in many countries throughout the world. That’s why it’s so important for you to protect yourself. In the UK, such diseases are kept at bay by the high immunisation rates.

How do vaccines work?

A vaccine contains a small part of the bacterium or virus that causes a disease, or tiny amounts of the chemicals the bacterium produces.

Vaccines work by causing the body’s immune system to make antibodies (substances to fight infections and diseases). So if you come into contact with the infection, the antibodies will recognise it and protect you.

Pre-School and School aged immunisations

When your child starts school or transfers school please ensure your school has your most up to date email address and mobile telephone number, to ensure you receive the link to your Childs immunisation information and consent form.

If you do not have access to the internet or mobile phone you can contact the service directly who will be happy to support you 0151 295 3833

 

Schedule of School based immunisations

Annual Nasal Flu Vaccine

The children's flu vaccine is safe and effective. It's offered every year as a nasal spray to children to help protect them against flu.

Flu is caused by a virus. It can be a very unpleasant illness for children. It can also lead to serious problems, such as bronchitis and pneumonia.

Children spread flu easily. Vaccinating them also protects others who are vulnerable to flu, such as babies and older people.

Further information can be found on NHS uk

3 years and 4 months- Before starting school

MMR (2nd dose)
4-in-1 pre-school booster
12 to 13 years – Year 8 HPV vaccine
14 years – Year 9 3-in-1 teenage booster
MenACWY

Speak to your GP surgery if:

  • you think you or your child have missed any vaccinations
  • you or your child have a vaccination appointment – but you've missed it or cannot attend

They can book or rearrange the next available appointment.

It’s best to have vaccines on time, but you can still catch up on most vaccines if you miss them.

The Vaccination and Immunisation Team consists of Registered Nurses and Health Care Support Workers who deliver the National School Age Programme of Immunisations in Liverpool. Check out this information on childhood vaccines.

 

The World Health Organization (WHO) says

The two public health interventions that have had the greatest impact on the world’s health are clean water and vaccines.

 View the figures here or below:

Infographic_Vaccines_v5.jpg

 

 

Why do we need immunisation?

The national immunisation programme has meant that dangerous diseases, such as polio, have disappeared in the UK. But these diseases could come back – they are still around in many countries throughout the world. That’s why it’s so important for you to protect yourself. In the UK, such diseases are kept at bay by the high immunisation rates.

 

How do vaccines work?

A vaccine contains a small part of the bacterium or virus that causes a disease, or tiny amounts of the chemicals the bacterium produces.

Vaccines work by causing the body’s immune system to make antibodies (substances to fight infections and diseases). So if you come into contact with the infection, the antibodies will recognise it and protect you.

 

Primary school Immunisations

 

Annual Nasal Flu Vaccine

During primary school your child will be offered their nasal flu spray between September to December

The children's flu vaccine is safe and effective. It's offered every year as a nasal spray to children to help protect them against flu.

Flu is caused by a virus. It can be a very unpleasant illness for children. It can also lead to serious problems, such as bronchitis and pneumonia.

Children spread flu easily. Vaccinating them also protects others who are vulnerable to flu, such as babies and older people.

More information can be found on NHS uk

Your school will send out a link to all parents/carers with Flu information and consent forms for completion.

Please make sure you have given your school your correct Email address and Mobile number to receive this link. 

 

Speak to your GP surgery if:

  • you think you or your child have missed any vaccinations
  • you or your child have a vaccination appointment – but you've missed it or cannot attend

They can book or rearrange the next available appointment.

It’s best to have vaccines on time, but you can still catch up on most vaccines if you miss them

The Vaccination and Immunisation Team consists of Registered Nurses and Health Care Support Workers who deliver the National School Age Programme of Immunisations in Liverpool. Here is some information on childhood vaccines.

The World Health Organization (WHO) says

The two public health interventions that have had the greatest impact on the world’s health are clean water and vaccines.

 View the figures here or below:

Infographic_Vaccines_v5.jpg

VaccinesSaveLives.png

Why do we need immunisation?

The national immunisation programme has meant that dangerous diseases, such as polio, have disappeared in the UK. But these diseases could come back – they are still around in many countries throughout the world. That’s why it’s so important for you to protect yourself. In the UK, such diseases are kept at bay by the high immunisation rates.

 

How do vaccines work?

A vaccine contains a small part of the bacterium or virus that causes a disease, or tiny amounts of the chemicals the bacterium produces.

Vaccines work by causing the body’s immune system to make antibodies (substances to fight infections and diseases). So if you come into contact with the infection, the antibodies will recognise it and protect you.

 

Secondary school Immunisations

When you child starts secondary school. Please ensure you have given school your correct Email address and Mobile number as this is how you will receive information regarding their upcoming immunisations and access the online to their consent form. 

 

Annual Nasal Flu Vaccine

The children's flu vaccine is safe and effective. It's offered every year as a nasal spray to children to help protect them against flu.

Flu is caused by a virus. It can be a very unpleasant illness for children. It can also lead to serious problems, such as bronchitis and pneumonia.

Children spread flu easily. Vaccinating them also protects others who are vulnerable to flu, such as babies and older people.

Further information can be found at NHS uk

 

Year 8 – HPV Vaccination

Girls and boys aged 12 to 13 years are offered the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine as part of the NHS vaccination programme.

The HPV vaccine helps protect against cancers caused by HPV, including:

It also helps protect against genital warts.

In England, girls and boys aged 12 to 13 years are routinely offered the 1st HPV vaccination when they're in school Year 8. The second dose is offered 6 to 24 months after the first dose.

It's important to have both doses of the vaccine to be properly protected.

For further information please visit NHS uk

 

Year 9 – Teenage Booster and Meningitis ACWY

The teenage booster, also known as the 3-in-1 or the Td/IPV vaccine, is given to boost protection against 3 separate diseases: tetanus, diphtheria and polio.

The MenACWY vaccine is also routinely offered to teenagers in school Years 9

The MenACWY vaccine is given by a single injection into the upper arm and protects against 4 strains of the meningococcal bacteria – A, C, W and Y – which cause meningitis and blood poisoning (septicaemia).

Children will receive these two immunisations one in each arm

 

MMR – (Measles, Mumps and Rubella) vaccine

If your child have not received 2 doses of MMR vaccine the service can also offer these with your consent with year 9 vaccinations

The MMR vaccine is a safe and effective combined vaccine.

It protects against 3 serious illnesses:

These highly infectious conditions can easily spread between unvaccinated people.

Getting vaccinated is important, as these conditions can also lead to serious problems including meningitis, hearing loss and problems during pregnancy.

2 doses of the MMR vaccine provide the best protection against measles, mumps and rubella.

 

Speak to your GP surgery if

you think you or your child have missed any vaccinations

you or your child have a vaccination appointment – but you've missed it or cannot attend

They can book or rearrange the next available appointment.

 

It’s best to have vaccines on time, but you can still catch up on most vaccines if you miss them.

Immunisation

It’s an exciting time thinking about your next choices and opportunities after school.

It’s important you are up to date with your immunisations before you start college, university or enter the workplace. 

Ensuring you are fully protected will ensure can enjoy your next experiences knowing you aren’t at risk of catching mumps or measles and that you have done all you can to protect yourself  and others from meningococcal disease.

With lots of people in confined environments and close mixing, universities can be hot spots for measles, mumps and meningococcal disease as they present the perfect opportunity for the infection to spread.

It’s never too late to get protected, contact your GP or immunisation team on 0151 295 3833 who will be happy to help

There has recently been an increase in measles cases across England as well as large measles outbreaks across Europe. We have also have seen outbreaks of mumps in universities in England. Teenagers and young adults who have not had two doses of MMR vaccine are particularly vulnerable to mumps and measles.

Similarly, a recent rise in cases of MenW meningococcal disease, led to the MenACWY vaccine being offered to teenagers.

 

Think measles, it's not just a kids' problem

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Mumps at Uni.png

 

Mersey Care NHS Foundation Trust is developing an electronic consent process for school based immunisations across Liverpool, Sefton, Knowsley and St Helens. This is an exciting new venture.  

We know from other immunisation providers who have implemented E-consent across the country that there are many additional benefits. E-consent is environmentally friendly and will provide greater reassurance with regards to infection control measures whilst in this pandemic.

Electronic consents will be implemented for our forthcoming flu campaign from September onwards. The nasal flu spray will be offered to all children and young people from reception to Year 11.

Families will receive a link from their child’s school by email or text message and will be asked to complete the consent form online. We do have other resources available for anyone who cannot access online facilities. Parents/carers can contact the service on the numbers below to receive further support and give their consent.  

On receipt of this link, please complete for your child even if you do not want them to receive this immunisation. We can then update their records accordingly and avoid you receiving any further follow up letters or phone calls from our service.

It will be resent out in September, please ensure your preferred email address and mobile number is up to date with school.

The children's flu vaccine is safe and effective. It's offered every year as a nasal spray to children to help protect them against flu. Flu is caused by a virus. It can be a very unpleasant illness for children. It can also lead to serious problems, such as bronchitis and pneumonia. Children spread flu easily.  Vaccinating them also protects others who are vulnerable to flu, such as babies and older people.

 

Any problems please contact your local immunisation teams:

Liverpool: 0151 295 3833

Sefton: 0151 247 6130

Knowsley: 0151 676 5141

St Helens: 01744 624 353

 

Latest update

On 17 September 2021 NHSE/I confirmed their intention to commission Sefton immunisation service to deliver COVID-19 vaccinations within school settings and school hours. This was to run alongside the annual Flu campaign, which has been extended this year to include all children in years 8 to 11.

On 20 September, Sefton immunisation team started delivery of the annual Flu campaign as planned, resulting in them having no capacity to support the COVID-19 vaccine programme.

In order to deliver the COVID-19 vaccination programme within the required timescales, with skilled staff running alongside the Flu campaign, Sefton 0 to 19 service has had to secure resource from the existing school health team. This equates to 10 school nurses being required to support the programme for eight weeks, commencing 11 October. During this time, the school health service will function at 51% of registered nurse capacity.

As a result, the school health team will need to prioritise what they do. This will include:

  • Ensuring the daily duty role is covered so all calls are responded to
  • Continue to support Multi Agency Safeguarding Hub -MASH -enquiries
  • Prioritise attendance at strategy and initial case conferences and consider sending reports to review case conferences when clinically indicated or joining virtually
  • Attendance at essential meetings only
  • The team will advise schools to complete school nurse referral forms and send them to the service via email where they will be triaged and prioritised by duty
  • Team managers and educational lead will increase their clinical input
  • Cancel all non-mandatory training planned during these eight weeks
  • Health promotion, NCMP and hearing and vision screening will commence in January 2022
  • Suspend the Lancaster model assessments and complete one year group only in this academic year.

We have prepared a list of Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs).

If you have any queries or concerns regarding this communication please contact: Silvia Ferrer-Valls, Head of Operations silvia.ferrer-valls@merseycare.nhs.uk or Clare Handley, School Health Team Manager Clare.Handley@merseycare.nhs.uk


Why should I have my child vaccinated?

The UK’s Chief Medical Officers all agree that while COVID-19 is typically mild or asymptomatic in most young people, it can be very unpleasant for some and 1 dose of the vaccine will provide good protection against severe illness and hospitalisation.

Vaccinating 12 to 15 year-olds should also help to reduce the need for young people to have time off school and reduce the risk of spread of COVID-19 within schools.

The COVID-19 secondary schools vaccine programme should therefore provide protection to young people

This will have a positive impact on keep our young people emotionally well and happier and reduce the disruption to face to face education.

Further information can be found below:

 

 

 

This leaflet is now available to download in audio format

And also in braille – on demand from the Healthpublications website. The same leaflet is available on GOV.UK in Arabic, Bengali, Chinese, German, Gujarati, Hindi, Italian, Polish, Romani, Romanian, Somali, Tagalog, Tamil, Turkish and Urdu which can be viewed using the following link 

Protecting your child against flu - Information for parents and carers

Protect yourself against fly - Information for those in school years 7 to 11

Flu: 5 reasons to have the vaccine

Flu: 5 reasons to vaccinate your child 

Flu hero video

Flu Spray Demonstration

Childhood Flu Information

Nasal Flu Vaccine and Porcine Gelatine

If you require this information in Arabic, Bengali or Urdu language please click here

 

News item 10 July 2019

HPV vaccine.jpg

The BBC reports that health officials say the HPV vaccine for 12 to 13 year old boys, starting after the summer, will prevent 29,000 cancers in UK men in the next 40 years. The jab protects against human papilloma virus, which causes many oral, throat and anal cancers. Boys aged 12 and 13 will be offered the vaccine in secondary schools from the start of the next school term - in England, Scotland, Northern Ireland and Wales.

Leaflet pdf

Teenagers and first year university students are advised to have a vaccination to prevent meningitis and septicaemia, which can be deadly. Find out more on NHS Choices.

Meningitis and Septicaemia leaflet

 

MMR Leaflet

There are leaflets available from Public Health England in other languages.

Additional flyers are also available in Hindu, Italian, Lithuanian, Portuguese, Polish, Romani, Romanian, Spanish, Swahili, Tamil, Ukrainian and Urdu, which can be found HERE.